Appears in: Rig on Press Freedom

How can one ably document stories about protecting forests and wetlands in a country that is constantly at war or some form of political conflicts?

This question is much more relevant in countries such as South Sudan where stories about refugees and those about the environment often clash making it difficult for journalists wade through a different kind of conflict.

Post date: 1 month 2 weeks ago
Appears in: Rig on Press Freedom

In March 2024, South Sudan faced an unprecedented heatwave, forcing the government to shut down schools nationwide, leaving both learners and teachers in limbo, unsure of when they would reopen. As the temperatures soared above 40 degrees Celsius, the heatwave was expected to last for at least two weeks, putting the country in a state of crisis.

Post date: 1 month 2 weeks ago
Appears in: Rig on Press Freedom
Post date: 1 month 2 weeks ago
Appears in: Rig on Press Freedom

In South Sudan, the media ownership structure hinders efforts to document stories on environment and climate change.

Post date: 1 month 2 weeks ago
Appears in: Rig on Press Freedom

In Malakal, in the Upper Nile State of South Sudan, journalists gathered early this month to celebrate the World Press Freedom Day. At the end of the day’s events, they all made one important call: more training to improve their skills.

Post date: 1 month 2 weeks ago
Appears in: Rig on Press Freedom

The reality is that many nations are experiencing rapid changes in the environment that have the potential to reshape nature and human life through direct exposure to sunlight and causing unexpected natural calamities. In fact, the Government of Malawi issued strict penalties on those engaged in illegal charcoal production in 2022, making it difficult for its population to use this form of energy.

Post date: 1 month 2 weeks ago
Appears in: Rig on Press Freedom

Environmental journalists in Malawi have urged the government to stop intimidating them and respect their right to reporting while they cover stories.
James Chavula, an environmental journalist and the Deputy Secretary General of the Association of Environmental Journalists (AEJ) in Malawi, blames corrupt government officials who only care about self satisfaction rather than serving the public interest.

Post date: 1 month 2 weeks ago
Appears in: Rwanda, Rig on Press Freedom

For decades, Rwanda’s environmental narrative focused on her biodiversity and conservation efforts. However, a new chapter is unfolding with a growing number of environmental journalists across Rwandan Journalism institutions. The growing field of environmental journalism is not only raising awareness about critical ecological issues, but is empowering citizens to protect the environment. The rise in environmental journalism in Rwanda is fueled by a growing awareness of its importance.

Post date: 1 month 2 weeks ago
Appears in: Rwanda, Rig on Press Freedom

In a country hailed for its remarkable achievements in protecting the environment, a quiet struggle unfolds. Environmental journalism in Rwanda faces a complex web of laws and policies that support and stifle its growth at the same time. As the world grapples with issues of climate change and sustainability, Rwanda's experience offers valuable insights into the intricate balance between governance and green reporting.

Post date: 1 month 2 weeks ago
Appears in: Rwanda, Rig on Press Freedom

In the fight for safety of those who bring critical environmental stories to light, the Rwanda Environmental Journalists (REJ) are stepping up their efforts to protect reporters facing threats and intimidation. This comes amidst a growing concern for press freedom in the region, where journalists investigating environmental issues can be particularly vulnerable.

Post date: 1 month 2 weeks ago

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